I think all of these are fantastic, and not just for the first week back.

revolutionizeed:

Time Line Challenge

Print 10-12 photos from the time period you will be studying. Mix up the photographs and distribute them to random students in the classroom. Have the kids with photos head to the front and hold up their photo. Ask the rest of the class to work with those standing to correctly arrange the photos chronologically. Lead a discussion that allows kids to explain their order and to introduce future content.

It also works great to divide your class in half, give each group the same set of photos and have the two groups create “competing” timelines. Let them argue for the correct order and work to convince students in the opposing group to change sides. You might give extra credit to the group with the largest number of students. Provide the correct order and subtract points for any mistakes made by the “winning” group. Give those points to other group.

Man…I’m tempted to do this one the first day of class…

(Source: revolutionizeed, via )

Create interactive timelines
A fantastic social studies/history resource.  Not only can you create a timeline but then add pictures to it.

Create interactive timelines

A fantastic social studies/history resource.  Not only can you create a timeline but then add pictures to it.

Animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry, with “commentary” so you know what’s going on.  A fantastic resource!

Infographics of the Day: How Segregated Is Your City?
 Every city is integrated (and segregated) in unique ways.
Recently, cartographer Bill Rankin produced an astounding map of Chicago, which managed to show the city’s areas of racial integration.
Eric Fischer saw those maps, and took it upon himself to create similar ones for the top 40 cities in the United States.  Fisher used a straight forward method borrowed from Rankin: Using U.S.  Census data from 2000, he created a map where one dot equals 25 people.  The dots are then color-coded based on race: White is pink; Black is  blue; Hispanic is orange, and Asian is green.
This picture shows New York city, click through for more

Infographics of the Day: How Segregated Is Your City?

 Every city is integrated (and segregated) in unique ways.

Recently, cartographer Bill Rankin produced an astounding map of Chicago, which managed to show the city’s areas of racial integration.

Eric Fischer saw those maps, and took it upon himself to create similar ones for the top 40 cities in the United States. Fisher used a straight forward method borrowed from Rankin: Using U.S. Census data from 2000, he created a map where one dot equals 25 people. The dots are then color-coded based on race: White is pink; Black is blue; Hispanic is orange, and Asian is green.

This picture shows New York city, click through for more

(The image is of a right hand with two S‘s branded beneath the thumb. The old-style of photography reversed images.)
From the Daguerreian Society…

The inscription on the back of the case reads: This Daguerreotype was taken by Southworth Aug. 1845. It is a copy of   Captain Jonathan Walker’s hand as branded by the U.S. Marshall of the   Dist. of Florida for having helped 7 men to obtain “Life Liberty, and   Happiness.”

S.S. stood for “Slave Stealer” to those who inflicted the punishment. To others, it meant “Slave Savior.”

(The image is of a right hand with two S‘s branded beneath the thumb. The old-style of photography reversed images.)

From the Daguerreian Society…

The inscription on the back of the case reads:

This Daguerreotype was taken by Southworth Aug. 1845. It is a copy of Captain Jonathan Walker’s hand as branded by the U.S. Marshall of the Dist. of Florida for having helped 7 men to obtain “Life Liberty, and Happiness.”

S.S. stood for “Slave Stealer” to those who inflicted the punishment. To others, it meant “Slave Savior.”

The history of the English language in 10 minutes (part one).  See the rest.

(Source: sgtsatine)

(Source: brittanyschray)

thruflowheater:

A teacher is showing her students something on a local map, ca. 1930 - ca. 1942photo from Staatsarchiv des Kantons Bern

thruflowheater:

A teacher is showing her students something on a local map, ca. 1930 - ca. 1942

photo from Staatsarchiv des Kantons Bern